Lijit Ad Tag

Nov 5, 2012

Mango Pomelo Sago Dessert







What a mouthful for a dish.
How do I make a one-word name for this ....
Mangelo Dessert? Pomango? Pangelo?

Oh heck, whatever you call it, it isn't an original so perhaps I shouldn't change the name. Pretty boring tho, don't you think? For something so delicious, I'd call it something a little fancier ... like maybe, Golden Mango Puree with Pomelo Jewels and Sago Pearls .... oh, good grief! Cheesy!

I first tasted this in a Hongkong styled restaurant in Singapore. Totally fell in love with it! Very refreshing!
Altho it's very much in the Hongkong dessert trend, the Singaporeans claim it's created by them. 
Whatever. I've just recreated it and ... have added my own twist as well ... you know, my usual.
I've found a sprinkle of finely sliced sweet basil actually compliments the dessert beautifully. Those who aren't into basil, you can omit that. I personally think it's adds a certain sophistication to the flavors. 


INGREDIENTS

2 medium-sized ripe mangoes
200 ml coconut milk 
200 ml water
pomelo flesh, amount depends on how much you want to put into it (Separate out the sacs. This takes some doing but I find it quite therapeutic)
1.5 cup sago pearls

simple syrup (see below for instructions)
finely sliced sweet basil leaves (optional)

*Note: You could substitute the pomelo sacs with grapefruit. I haven't tried it ... yet. Will keep you updated on that. 


METHOD

First, prepare the sago.
Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil. Sprinkle in the sago pearls and cook for 10 minutes. Stir every now and then to prevent sticking.
Turn off heat and cover the pot. Leave for 10 minutes.
Drain into a fine wire sieve and rinse with cold running water to remove excess starch. Leave aside while you prepare the other ingredients.

Peel and remove flesh off mangoes. 
Place in a food processor or blender together with the coconut cream and water. Blend til smooth.
Add sago to the puree, stir to mix and refrigerate. 
When you're ready to serve, add the pomelo sacs (about 1 or 2 tbs to each cup, or more if you prefer) and simple syrup to sweeten.
Serve cold with a sprinkling of sliced basil and extra cubed mangoes (if there are any left).

*Not to be kept too long as the mango flesh tends to turn brown due to oxidation. Still ok to eat but not too pretty.


SIMPLE SYRUP

INGREDIENTS

1.5 cup sugar
1.5 cup water


METHOD

Place both ingredients into a saucepan and heat on low until sugar has melted.
Cool before use.
(You can even do this in the microwave using a microwave safe container)

*I've found this amount to be enough for the above dessert portion. But if you have a sweeter tooth than I, just double up the amount or remember the 1:1 ratio of sugar to water.

For those who aren't too familiar with the fruit, you can check it out here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomelo
It's similar to a grapefruit, 3 - 5 times bigger, milder, less bitter and have bigger and juicier sacs.
Darn, I should have taken a pic of the fruit before I massacred it!








54 comments:

  1. I would want to try that! Looks so nice! Bet it tastes great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love this! I guess the family does too since it disappears very quickly each time it's made :)
      Try it out, make some. Super easy.

      Delete
  2. Ping, that looks really yummy! I am not a fan of pomelo but mangoes, I love. But I guess a bit of pomelo should be alright for me. And I love sago pearls in desserts. Yeah, I think the basil adds a little something special to the dessert.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! The pomelo here does a lot for the dish. The tiny pop when you bite into them makes it for me!

      Delete
  3. It sounds really refreshing. Though I don't know what pomelo is and I have difficulty saying Mango Pomelo Sago quickly.
    This sort of reminds me of the Taiwanese drink with sago balls. Maybe HK copied from Taiwan, copied by Singapore and invented in Malaysia:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, sorry. I guess since it's so common here, I took it for granted that everyone would know what a pomelo is. You can look it up here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomelo. And I will put a link on the post as well. Thanks for that. It's actually similar to a ginormous grapefruit, less tart with bigger and fatter, juicier sacs.

      Delete
    2. Thanks. I think I know what it is, I last had it long time ago. I don't see it here, not even in the exotic fruits section.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful, Ping! And your sprinkle of basil is an elegant, delicious touch!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lizzy! The basil really is a lovely addition. Heavenly!

      Delete
  5. Hi Ping, I love this dessert very much and thanks for sharing this lovely recipe. Very pretty indeed :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ann! Btw, is this a Singapore creation?

      Delete
  6. didn't realised there's coconut milk in this manpogo dessert :D shucks run out of santan, else would try tomorrow, without the po

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can substitute santan with evaporated milk. The "po" gives a nice juicy pop in the mouth.

      Delete
  7. Ping, the photo is as always beautiful and artistic. The dish sounds so summery and refreshing, I want to shut myself at home, enjoy a bowl of your fabulous dessert and refuse to accept we are in the middle of cold, rainy autumn.
    Like most of your desserts this one looks extremely exotic and unusual to me. I would have never think of combining pomelo and mango. This must be an incredible mixture! (Pomelo is available here all winter long). The funniest thing is that I have had sago pearls (mine are green) in my kitchen for at least two years and have never touched them. They looked so cute in my Vietnamese/Asian shop, I just couldn't resist. Now I know what to do with them! It's actually the first time I see a recipe with sago on a friendly blog. Thank you for the excellent idea and inspiration.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Sissi! I'm sorry you're having horrid weather. At this moment, I'm happy with our rainstorms ... beats the heat anytime, altho the floods aren't helping the traffic situation much. Can't have it all, I guess.
      I'm surprised to hear that you can get pomelo esp after all the comments saying how difficult it is to find one. I'm even thinking of making one with grapefruit as an option for those who can't get their hands on pomelo.
      You have the green sago pearls? Those are suppose to be pandan flavored. I've used the white ones. It doesn't really matter ... it might just change the color of your dessert :)
      We even get pink ones here. I've seen them but haven't really looked at it to see if they are flavored or colored ... not too interested in that color!
      There is another popular local dessert using sago. I will try make it and post it so that you can use up your sago pearls :) Husband's not complaining, it's his all time favorite dessert!

      Delete
    2. Thank you Ping for the green sago pearls information. Frankly when I bought them I had no idea what they are used for ;-) I have seen several colours here, even multicoloured! I'm looking forward to use them.
      I have been seeing pomelo in the winter for many years now. It's quite easy to get in Switzerland I think, but I tasted the first one a long time ago in Poland so maybe it's easy to get all around Europe? They usually appear at the same time as grapefruits).
      Talking about colours... I have just realised that there is lots of yellow in your dish photos! I love yellow in food. It's such a sunny colour :-)

      Delete
  8. Ping, I tasted my first ripe mango last week - a rare thing in Ireland - and what a revelation! WOW. This dessert must be amazing, whatever you choose to call it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay! I'm glad you got to taste a mango. We've taken the fruit for granted (even pomelo)since we get it almost the whole year round. There are so many different types of mangoes tho. You really must try them when you can get your hands on them. Each has a different unique fragrance and some are more favored for use in desserts such as this.

      Delete
  9. You do realize that your desserts are killing me, right? I've made your coconut pudding cake exactly 5 times (!!!) since last dropping in about it... Thankfully, I have plenty of help eating your delights :). I love the idea of a creamy coconut puree...(pomelo might be a bit trickier to find but I shall persist ;-)). It won't be long before I try this beaut!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hehe .... isn't that the whole idea of food blogging?
      I'm so happy you're enjoying the coconut cake! Such a lovely comment to wake up to ... it's made my day!
      I've added a little note on this post with a suggestion of using grapefruit instead of pomelo. Didn't realise it's so rare in other parts of the world. I haven't tried it but I will soon. I'm imagining it'll work quite well altho it could have a little bitter aftertaste of the grapefruit.

      Delete
  10. Hai...hai...hai, you must be wondering I keep sighing? I saw 2 postings of this few weeks ago so I went to look for pomelo! Aske my MIL where can I get it & she told me that after mid autumn festival, we can't find it anymore. That's why I'm sighing! Can look look only, hahaha! Your mango pomelo sago dessert looks delicious! Anyway, I've thought of what to use to replace with pomelo, hahaha, if I have time to make it, will share with you later, cheers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grapefruit! Try using that. It might be slightly more tart but the sweetness can be tweaked by adding more sugar syrup or if your mangoes are very sweet it should work. I also am going to try that soon.
      Looking forward to your version!

      Delete
  11. oh la la! as soon as mangoes appear at the grocery store (it's winter here), i am going to make this! can't wait!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Amanda! Hope you get to make this soon! Enjoy!

      Delete
  12. I had no idea what sago was. Had to look it up. What an interesting treat! I love mango so I know I would love this as well, but have no idea where to get sago or pomelo for that matter. But I do love learning about new ingredients because when I find them, I love trying them! Beautiful picture!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, MJ.
      I really shouldn't take it for granted what we use so commonly here. I'm glad you've managed to find out what it is.I would think you can get the sago pearls from asian stores but pomelos might be a bit of a problem. I've suggested using grapefruit instead.
      I hope you'll get to try this someday.

      Delete
  13. I can't live without you...MANGO! ahhahahaha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ayoyo ... luckily you said mango, and luckily for you I'm not a guy!

      Delete
  14. Hi Ping - what a truly glorious looking dessert - the name is definitely quite a mouthful, haha. I vote for "MaPoSa Dessert" - nice and short name :) It looks so velvety, and I can well imagine the fantastic flavours from the fruits!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Charles. Thank you. Maposa sounds pretty exotic, Chinesey even. "Ma Po Tofu" is Chinese dish :)
      This is a little like custard ... very thick pureed mango. Can't seem to show the little sago pearls inside tho.

      Delete
  15. A gorgeous, refreshing, and elegant dessert, Ping! There's no way we would find decent looking mangoes here in S. Florida at this time of the year, so I will just have to wait till next summer to make a yummy dessert such as yours. (come to think of it, I did see mango slices ready to purchase in a plastic container, but they cost a 'fortune' for a few slices)
    Your photos are always superb! xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Elisabeth. Didn't realize it's so expensive over there. Hope you'll get some in summer then.

      Delete
  16. This is lovely. It reminds me of Sissi's coconut cream with canned peaches recipe. I loved that one and I am sure I would love this too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Zsuzsa. Yes, I remember Sissi's dessert. That was super!

      Delete
  17. Hi Ping, found your blog from PH's bloglist - i love all things pomelo! Tis is indeeed a very refreshing dessert, now i'm gonna be thinking about this for the next xxx days until i get to eat it...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, Esther. Thanks for coming by. I hope you get to try this out soon.

      Delete
  18. Hi Ping, your Mangopomelo dessert is excellent. Look so refreshing, slurrrpppp.... :)

    Have a nice week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Amelia! Have a good weekend.

      Delete
  19. I've never had a pomelo, always wanted to try one. Was at our local Asian Seafood Market (which is a weird name since they don't sell any seafood) yesterday and saw one pondering again how to use it. I love your carved JackoLantern for Halloween too (delayed comment since I could not comment from my phone on it prior).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Toni. Perhaps you may have come across the Tangelo ... across between a tangerine and a pomelo. I haven't had that but I'm guessing it could be a little more sour than the pomelo. You can just eat the pomelo without doing anything to it. If it's nice and juicy ... otherwise, the not so fresh ones could get a little gritty.
      That's funny ... a seafood market with no seafood :)

      Delete
  20. I have seen this dessert in another blog long time ago. I can't recall who did that. Anyway yours looks delicious. Every when I have a pomelo, I only remember I want to try this dessert after I have finished the pomelo. LOL!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Veron. Haha! Funny you said that.. coz I've wanted to make this for the longest time, even at the time when you gave me the pomelo but, like you, I always eat it all up before anything can happen :)

      Delete
  21. I've never used a pomelo in cooking and you've inspired me---great dessert!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Squishy Monster! It's usually made into a salad but this was a nice change.

      Delete
  22. Huhu Ping!

    The other day I realized, that the fruit that I have been calling grapefruit here in goa, is in fact a pomelo. Now I am not even sure anymore if that tree in our garden is a grapefruit tree. lol We ll be able to know that once it grows up.

    Looks so pretty Ping and I get all those ingredients here. yay!

    Thanks for sharing my dear friend. =)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hiya Helene! Haha! That's a nice surprise waiting ... pomelo, grapefruit?
      I'm glad you can get all the ingredients where you are. This really is worth making. It's so refreshing even if it's a thick puree. Esp when you get the pop of the juicy pomelo sacs when you bite into it ... mmmm ... now you've got me wanting this again! I wonder if there are still pomelos for sale? Hmm ...

      Delete
  23. hi ping, i also tasted this once in hkg. I like it, actually after that trip , i wanted to try making this at home but never get to do it. i'm sure you hv replicated it very well, sweet basil? oh yes, i'm friends with sweet basil :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So, it is a Hongkong creation. Well, that's nice to know. I hope you make this and like this with or without the basil :)

      Delete
  24. One of my fave desserts too! I tried making but the sago always lump together even when I rinse them in cold water. The lumps start when I set them aside...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have great taste! :)
      Yeah, them sago tend to set real quick. You could leave them soaking in a bowl of water after rinsing and then rinse out the 2nd lot of water just as you're ready to use. Hope that helps.

      Delete